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Senior Living Blog

Happily Ever Aging
...a UMH Senior Living Blog

Everything you need to know about caring for your loved one - at home or at a senior living community.

Jim Stinson

I first became an ordained member of the New York Conference of the United Methodist Church fifty years ago. Through my time with the pastoral ministry, I worked extensively with older adults, many of whom were members of my congregation. I also served as the Director of Spiritual Life for United Methodist Homes from July 2002 until my retirement in July 2015, providing guidance and support to residents, family members, and staff. I love reminding people that “old” is not a dirty word and encourage others to adopt a healthy perspective on aging. I am also the author of a book, Just Because I Am Old – A Practical and Theological Guide To Caring, which was recently published in 2014.

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Aging & Caregiving

“Walking in the Dark”

By: Jim Stinson
August 4th, 2015

One of my best memories of growing up in a crowded neighborhood in Brooklyn was the ride we took each summer at the end of June. 

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assisted living | caregiver tips | 60-day stay trial | Aging & Caregiving

"When It Comes To Dying"

By: Jim Stinson
June 2nd, 2015

“When it comes to dying, I’m an amateur. I haven’t done it - I think when I come to it, I will still be an amateur, somewhere between frightened and terrified.”   (Sam Keen, Graceful Passages)

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assisted living | caregiver tips | 60-day stay trial | Aging & Caregiving

Meeting A Care Receiver On His Own Turf

By: Jim Stinson
April 14th, 2015

After knocking on his door and asking permission to come in, I introduced myself to a new resident at Bishop Wicke Health and Rehabilitation Center, where I serve as the Director of Spiritual Life.

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assisted living | caregiver tips | Aging & Caregiving

Laughing, Healing, and Your Aging Loved One

By: Jim Stinson
March 31st, 2015

Some years ago we took our nearly teenaged son to the doctor. We did so because he was complaining of aches and pains all over his body.  

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assisted living | caregiver tips | Aging & Caregiving

"I Got Out Of The Shower"

By: Jim Stinson
March 26th, 2015

“I got out of the shower, dried myself off, looked in the mirror, decided I looked good for someone over ninety years old, smiled, got dressed, and started my day.” 

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assisted living | caregiver tips | Aging & Caregiving

Discovering the "In Between"

By: Jim Stinson
February 17th, 2015

There is a wonderful children’s book called God in Between. As with most children’s books, adults would do well to read it.It was written by Sandy Eisenberg Sasso and published by Jewish Lights Publishing in 1998 and is “For People of All Faiths, All Backgrounds.” It is one of the few books I kept when downsizing and moving to a condo. It is the story of a window-less, road-less, overgrown town, and its people who sense something missing in their lives. People are cut off from one another and cannot watch or see anything beyond their own four walls. They sense that if they can find God (whose existence is not certain to them) they might find what they are missing. Much to their surprise they are led to discover that God (the meaning for their lives) is not missing. He, She, It, has always been present, but unseen because they are not connected to each other. They discover that God is found “In the between. In between us.”

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assisted living | caregiver tips | aging parents | 60-day stay trial | Aging & Caregiving

Losing Patience : 5 Tips for Caregivers

By: Jim Stinson
January 27th, 2015

“What do you miss the most about being in your home of so many years?” That’s a question I often ask our newer residents when checking in on their adjustment to living in one of our communities at United Methodist Homes. Invariably the answer goes something like this: “I miss getting up, going downstairs, fixing a cup of coffee, enjoying it for awhile, having breakfast, and then going upstairs to wash and dress for the day.” Or, “I miss the daily routines, walking downtown, seeing neighbors, chatting, walking home with some little thing I might want or need during the remaining day.” Along with those comments comes a host of other things of that nature! 

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assisted living | Aging & Caregiving

Coping With Loss Over The Holidays

By: Jim Stinson
December 23rd, 2014

The holiday season is about over! For many that is a statement that is said with relief; for others it is said with a sense of wishing it could last a little longer.

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assisted living | caregiver information | 60-day stay trial | Aging & Caregiving

Always Saying Good-bye

By: Jim Stinson
October 7th, 2014

By Rev. Jim Stinson, Director of Spiritual Life for United Methodist Homes  “It seems as if we’re always saying goodbye.” This comment was shared from a resident in one of senior living communities at our Wesley Village Campus in Shelton, CT. It speaks to an all too common experience of older adults. Inevitably, as we age, more and more of our loved ones and friends precede us in death. It also speaks to a sense of loneliness often found among the aging.

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assisted living | caregiver information | bishop wicke shelton ct | Aging & Caregiving

“Kicking and Screaming”

By: Jim Stinson
September 30th, 2014

By Jim Stinson

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dementia care | assisted living | Aging & Caregiving

Going to “Grandma-Land”

By: Jim Stinson
August 21st, 2014

By Jim Stinson “I have a difficult time talking to my mother. We used to have wonderful conversations. But the more her dementia advances, the less intelligent our conversations become. What do I say to her, especially when her sense of reality has changed so much?”

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